Being in tattoo bussines also has great benefits

Along this line of thought is another form of policy called the “care sheet.” This is made up by you and handed to every customer after they receive a tattoo. Just you telling them about the after care and a big poster in front of the chair outlining the steps is not enough. (Which you ought to have anyway.) You must make up a sheet with each step printed on it explaining the care of a tattoo and the customer’s responsibility in taking care of it. This is important because the healing is critical in the quality of the tattoo and the health of the customer. Every precaution should be taken to ensure that they do this. An example of a Care Sheet can also be found in the end of the Chapter on Bandages. Study it carefully, and add anything else that you may feel is important. I certainly would not subtract from the information though. It is advisable to post a notice in a prominent area of the shop stating that you don’t tattoo people who are afflicted with sugar diabetes (they are prone to infection and heal poorly, or not at all). It also won’t hurt to include hemophiliacs on the same notice. Such a notice will provide you with some more legal protection.

Being in business for yourself has great benefits. One of these is that you are your own boss and you are responsible for making the money. In other words, you are writing your own check. But, just like an hourly wage, in the business world, time is money and time means money. You never want to be in a position where you are unnecessarily holding yourself up or finding yourself doing things twice. This costs you money or will keep you from making more money, and believe me, this is not professional.

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Tattoo Business Procedures

Just in case you don’t think you can handle all this on your own, employ the services of a good local attorney. He will always know people in the right places and whom to contact for the information you require. Let him do the leg work, after all, that’s what you will be paying him for and he won’t get the run around as you might get in some instances.
Always keep a receipt for all of the work that you do. Even for the smallest tattoo or whatever services you render. Remember that you are self-employed and you have to pay taxes. A course on bookkeeping would be practical in addition, just to keep your head on straight. There are a lot of deductions a business person can legally make, and one book on small business and another on tax information (from the I.R.S.) is a must. You have to know what you are doing here. It is not as complicated as you might think, but it is absolutely necessary to understand these things if you are going to survive as a self-employed business person.
One more thought about insurance. Today is the day of the lawsuit. People are very excited about getting a tattoo and will brag about them and pay large sums of money for them. But if something ever goes wrong, these same people will not give it a second thought to turn around and sue you right out of business. Some type of thought should be given to protect yourself from this ever happening. This type of protection is called the “trade release form.” This is a legally binding piece of paper between you and your customer, waiving any kind of responsibility on your part for damages or lawsuits of any kind after they leave the shop. It must be signed before you commence tattooing. An example of such a sheet is included at the end of this chapter. It should not be directly copied, it is just an example. Since it is such a great legal document, it is up to the tattooist and his lawyer to make one up. The price paid for this paper is worth it. Once made up, it will last you forever. Just have them copied or printed in quantities. Basically, the release form will cover topics like age and physical requirements, it will release you from liability from lawsuits and damages after the visit and anything else you and your lawyer can think up to protect yourself and keep yourself covered at all times. If a person takes one step into your shop and trips and falls and chips his teeth, you just might be liable (this even before the signing of the release). A sign “Enter at your own risk” in front of the store is at least some kind of coverage releasing you from a possible lawsuit. This kind of “insurance” is a must to have, but remember, it still does not release you from your responsibility. You owe it to everyone to do your best. You must ioW.ow ail the procedures in this site such as bandages and sterilization techniques and it is your responsibility to see to it that you perform them.

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Tattoo Business practices

Before even starting in the tattooing business, the material in this chapter should be given some serious thought. For example, how will you ever start tattooing if perhaps it is against the law in your community? Since it is a tattooing career that you wish to make it in, it would be smart to make sure no authorities will visit you and permanently shut you down. Whether doing business at home or at a shop (which will be the eventual goal), certain local and state ordinances should be looked into in depth.
The first step would be for you to investigate into the local laws at City Hall to see whether there are any conflicts with what you plan to do, and meet what they require on this subject. This also should involve a visit to the Sheriffs Department to check on other requirements and law stipulations. A trip there should be on your schedule regardless, just to clear things up like zoning and businesses.
Another important place to go see would be the Health Department to find out what they require. Be prepared to answer their questions like a pro. Knowing all the information in this site down pat would be an excellent start, and you should practice all the information in this book too, like a professional. Meet all the regulations that are required of you. You want to set up a respectable and permanent business and not be a gypsy outlaw. State, local and health laws vary greatly, so be sure to check them out and any other establishments that they point you to.
There are some other things to consider also, about other general business practices.
Before diving right into a shop, you better know exactly what makes up a legal shop and be prepared to meet those requirements. Also, some knowledge on real estate would help, so you don’t get stuck paying off a shop you can’t use. Look up zoning laws to be sure you can tattoo in the area. Once the shop is located and the deal is going through, it is wise to have business insurance on your shop and your equipment. In case of fire, theft or accident, you will be covered. If you are not covered, it could cost you the shop. An insurance policy is a small price to pay to be protected today.

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